Savannah Cox

Writer, Editor and Researcher

Location icon United States of America

New-York based writer and editor whose interests span from politics to gender and culture. My essays have appeared on The New Republic, Salon, AlterNet, Thrillist, the Louisville-Courier Journal, and Africa Is A Country, and reportage has appeared on DNAinfo New York and ATI.

Portfolio
New Republic
01/30/2017
Trump's Refugee Ban Isn't as Un-American as You Think

Where the U.S. federal government did not use law alone to prohibit "undesirables'" from entering America, it also made use of the sciences. Indeed, at the turn of the twentieth century U.S.

thrillist
12/30/2016
Bermuda's Riches Make for Your Most Absurd (and Cheap!) Island Weekend

Most people, and island clusters, simply dream about wealth. Then there's Bermuda. The 20-square-mile British territory takes those dreams, adds a gaggle of multimillion-dollar yachts, and turns them into a warped reality in the Middle of Nowhere, Atlantic Ocean.

Medium
06/03/2016
Playing the 'Foreign Policy' Card

It's Clinton's foreign policy record, not her gender, that will take her to the White House. As the 2016 presidential primaries inch closer to their ugly end, many on the left and right are looking at Hillary Clinton's foreign policy record with an increasingly critical eye.

DNAinfo New York
07/23/2015
Meet Pickle, the Dog Taking Over the New York City Art Scene

Meet Pickle, the 4-year-old French bulldog whose discerning taste in art has garnered her thousands of admirers on social media and increasingly in New York City art circles. When the Bushwick resident is not sniffing out talent in her own neighborhood, Pickle frequents galleries throughout the city with her owner, art adviser and New York native Katie Howard.

All That Is Interesting
10/31/2015
10 Questions You Have About China's One-Child Policy But Are Too Afraid To Ask

China's 35-year one-child policy is about to come to a close, the state run Xinhua-news agency reported this week. The 1980-enacted policy, which the government claims prevented approximately 400 million births, has met its end as the Chinese state hopes to "improve the balanced development of population" and deal with an aging population, according to a statement released by the Communist Party's Central Committee.

The Courier-Journal
Jack White, the World Cup and the art of 'stealing'

If the title of Jack White's latest album, "Lazaretto," is meant to convey how White views himself, he clearly hasn't been paying much attention to soccer lately. "Lazaretto" refers to a place where those suffering from contagious diseases - oftentimes leprosy - are held.

Africa is a Country
11/23/2014
What's Driving the Violence Against Latin American Environmentalists?

It was three days before Christmas in 1988. Much of the world-following a blisteringly hot summer-had really begun to worry about rising global temperatures. That night, Chico Mendes stepped outside of his cottage in Xapuri, Brazil only to drop dead moments later.

DNAinfo New York
New LES Art Exhibit Re-Examines 'Nature' in Human-Shaped World

From hanging out in the Mets' weight room to "invading" the backyards of South Park Slope residents, raccoons have been getting a lot of press lately. Many consider the increased presence of these charcoal-eyed creatures to be an annoyance, but Washington Heights artist Dana Sherwood views them as signs of something else: the Anthropocene.

The New Context
10/13/2014
Ebola Fever

This past August, Sabastina Onwubgeuzie decided to take a trip to Trinidad. Summer was coming to a close, and what better a way to commemorate that than by spending three weeks in the Caribbean with his wife?

The New Context
08/23/2014
Brighton Beach: Where East (Kind of) Meets West

A neon hammer and sickle sign flickers in angry, vindictive red as soon as I exit the Brighton Beach subway stop in Brooklyn, New York. It's not there to promote communism; instead it's a flashy attempt to sell mid-grade booze.

DNAinfo New York
Vendors Who Get Too Big Will Be Booted From DeKalb Food Hall, Owners Say

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN - Too big, you fail. The upcoming Dekalb Market Hall, a 31,000-square-foot space that will house some of the city's most distinctive local flavors in one central location when it opens in Fall 2016, plans to be a safe place for small businesses - so much so that if participating vendors get too big, they're out.

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