Linkedinnov2020

Jennie Z. Rose

Writing, Reporting, Copy Editing

Location icon United States

After starting my career as a music writer I have written some good copy, some bad copy and, yes, some ugly copy.

Having survived the music industry and its untimely death, I now bring more than a decade of experience in editorial and copyediting around climate and policy, film arts, and mental health.

Used to be, if my name ended up next to the word "thanks" on a band's liner notes, I'd get a little bump from my brain's reward center. For the most part, that was the only kind of recognition I wanted.

It wasn't until 2016 that I felt the warmth of a thank you made in semi-public. At the San Francisco International Film Festival premiere of "Not Without Us," my name had been added to the long list of people to thank at the credits. The surprise appreciation was better than if I had known about it ahead of time.

One might think that I have been throwing myself at the chance to surprised by a public thank you ever since. But no. I have not let that moment in the spotlight make me forget who I am and where I came from. I'm Jennie Rose from Oberlin Ohio and I have a writing habit.

My bylines include PMA magazine, Lateral magazine, Bay City Beacon, The Daily Climate, A Beautiful Perspective, WIRED, MTV, Time Out, Berkeley Ecology Center, and the PBS-affiliated KQED and Independent Lens.


Portfolio
Medium
01/08/2021
Answering California's Call for Mental Health Services

Within months of the stay-at-home orders last March, the mask of civil society slipped. By September, it became clear that although we may all be in the same storm, we are not all in the same boat.

Medium
03/09/2019
Dollars to Donuts and New Deals

The activist group Extinction Rebellion's human roadblocks brought London traffic to a standstill in early February. In the US, Climate Silence and the Climate Mobilization Project continue to mobilize citizens to "cancel the apocalypse." Meanwhile, several of the Democratic contenders have signed onto the Green New Deal framework - projects which are estimated to take trillions of dollars.

Medium
02/14/2018
JR and Agnès

During the riots in Clichy-sous-Bois outside Paris, JR was an 18- year-old street artist dodging fines for wheat pasting on buildings. Now 15 years later, the low profile JR keeps stays small in proportion to his growing body of work; he still will not be photographed, filmed, or interviewed without the signature dark glasses and a hat.

Medium
08/07/2020
Beware of Darkness

An eclipse used to cause a shitshow down on Earth. Vikings yelled to frighten away demon dogs that had been sent by Loki to feed upon the Sun and Moon. People bashed pots and pans together to scare Rahu, an Indian god. The Ojibwe shot flaming arrows at the Sun to reignite the pilot light.

Women's Environmental Network
09/10/2020
Tending the Career Flame During a Pandemic - Women's Environmental Network

Can you grow your career in a global pandemic? WEN put this question to the test recently at its late August event. Proving you can't keep a group of good women down, the event created a groundswell of energy that led to hundreds of new LinkedIn connections, a Slack channel with hot job leads, and a handful of potential new business collaborations.

Berkeley Science Review
2006
From Noise to Signal

A seismic hum and what it could mean for the Earth Sciences community.

Alternatives Journal: Canada's Environmental Voice
09/04/2019
Carbon Capture — The First May Not be the Last

In the race to remove the trillion tons of excess carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, the treatments we choose for this problem ought to at least be slightly better than the problem itself.

Independent Lens
2017
Banking on Seeds: Rare, Diverse, and Endangered

When National Geographic Magazine reported that about 94% of the world's vegetable seeds circa 1903 are now missing from the Earth, Taggart Siegel and Jon Betz promptly started work on a feature-length documentary about the seed saving movement.

Independent Lens
2018
Remember These? A Look Back at Pollution Public Service Announcements

As a lead in to the Independent Lens premiere of What Lies Upstream , which is an exposé about what led to a major source of water becoming poisoned after a disastrous chemical spill and the government's response thereto, take a trip down memory lane to look at how we used to warn people about pollution, chemicals, and other environmental hazards.

Women's Environmental Network
12/08/2019
Games for the Wise to Make Merry & Bright - Women's Environmental Network

There's something so right about a simple kitchen cluster when baby, it's cold outside. If goodwill is in the air and you feel it everywhere, the winter holidays can't be far away, right? Should you want to organize your guests this year, we offer a short list of 5 climate-related ideas for your consideration.

Bay City Beacon
09/18/2017
Pension System Balks at Calls to Divest from Fossil Fuels

While the San Francisco Board of Supervisors has voted unanimously since 2013 for full divestment from fossil fuels, the San Francisco Employees Retirement System (SFERS) has postponed its decision, even in the face of dismal returns. SFERS is now accused of "dithering" on the financial challenges of climate change.

KQED
01/18/2013
Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students

So how do educators help kids become problem-finders when they don't know what the problem is or where the next one might be coming from? "A lot of people hate this word but I think we have to take it seriously, which is relevance," Pink said.

KQED
09/28/2012
What Can 135 Million Video Gamers Add to Our Collective IQ?

Flickr:Blakespot By Jennie Rose An estimated 135 million people play video games, spending three billion hours a week glued to a screen. But that's not necessarily bad news. In fact, playing video games may be part of an evolutionary leap forward, according to Howard Rheingold, educator and author of the book Net Smart: How to Thrive Online.

KQED
07/27/2012
Can Kids Be Taught Persistence?

Flickr:Miish By Jennie Rose In his new book How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, author Paul Tough makes the case that persistence and grit are the biggest indicators of student success. Being resilient against failure, he says, is the fundamental quality we should be teaching kids, and he gives examples of where that's being done.

SEED Magazine
2006
50th Anniversary of DNA

A survey of the trivial, the provocative and the outright revolutionary since the discovery of the double helix.

A Beautiful Perspective
08/29/2017
Can fashion find its moral fiber?

It takes 2,700 liters of water to grow the cotton for one "Nevertheless, She Persisted" or "We Should All be Feminists" T-shirt, often sewn by a worker making just a few dollars per day. "Let's take a look at where that T-shirt was made. Where are the rights of the woman at the other end?"

Medium
09/12/2018
The First Rule of Suicide

September brings the end of summer vacation and the equally sobering National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. I wanted to write a suicide myth-buster, but from a mental health standpoint, it's a tough subject. Social stigma doesn't make it any easier.

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