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Katie Nodjimbadem

Reporter

I am a reporter and writer currently based in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire as a Fulbright fellow. Previously, I was the staff reporter at Smithsonian magazine.

Portfolio
Texas Monthly
10/21/2015
Kolaches in Washington D.C.

At eleven o'clock on a Saturday morning, the line outside American Ice Co., a small bar and restaurant in northwest Washington, D.C., wraps around the building. It's late August, and, in typical D.C. summer fashion, the heat is unforgiving.

Texas Monthly
03/13/2015
Chico and the Postman

Last October, as Leila Melendez navigated her way through El Paso International Airport, she stopped and noted how heavy her suitcase was and began to laugh. She laughed because inside her luggage, alongside toiletries and changes of clothes, were items that would have baffled anyone who wasn't from El Paso: twenty pounds of chorizo, asadero cheese, and tortillas from Barron's Superette, in El Paso's Mission Valley neighborhood.

Smithsonian
The Racial Segregation of American Cities Was Anything But Accidental

smithsonian.com It's not surprising to anyone who has lived in or visited a major American metropolitan region that the nation's cities tend to be organized in their own particular racial pattern. In Chicago, it's a north/south divide. In Austin, it's west/east. In some cities, it's a division based around infrastructure, as with Detroit's 8 Mile Road.

Smithsonian
How Ferris Bueller's Day Off Perfectly Illustrates the Power of Art Museums

Thirty years ago, a high school senior forever changed the game of cutting class. In 1986, the persistently optimistic Ferris Bueller of the fictional Shermer, Illinois, broke the fourth wall and invited filmgoers to join him in taking a break from the vapidity of high school because, as he says, "Life moves pretty fast.

Smithsonian
Smithsonian Researchers Are Bringing the Oryx Back to the Wild

Last September, researchers at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, were sitting at their computers poring over data that had been delivered via satellite from a game reserve in Chad, 6,000 miles away. The data-location coordinates and time stamps-had been collected on GPS collars worn by the most closely monitored herd of oryx on the planet.

Smithsonian
The Lesser-Known History of African-American Cowboys

smithsonian.com In his 1907 autobiography, cowboy Nat Love recounts stories from his life on the frontier so cliché, they read like scenes from a John Wayne film. He describes Dodge City, Kansas, a town smattered with the romanticized institutions of the frontier: "a great many saloons, dance halls, and gambling houses, and very little of anything else."

Smithsonian
How Conservationists Use GPS to Track the Wildest Horses in the World

smithsonian.com Picture a truly wild horse. You might be imagining a graceful mare rearing on her legs on the shores of Assateague Island, her golden mane silhouetted against the sunset. What you should be picturing is the shorter, stockier Przewalski's horse, the endangered subspecies that once roamed the steppe of China and Mongolia.

Smithsonian
How the African American History Museum Is Curating "Black Lives Matter"

smithsonian.com Three weeks ago the City of Chicago released dash camera footage of police shooting Laquan McDonald 16 times, killing him. In Baltimore the first trial is underway in the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old who died after suffering a spinal injury while in police custody.

Smithsonian
The Long, Painful History of Police Brutality in the U.S.

smithsonian.com Last month, hours after a jury acquitted former police officer Jeronimo Yanez of manslaughter in the shooting death of 32-year-old Philando Castile, protesters in St. Paul, Minnesota, shutdown Interstate 94. With signs that read: "Black Lives Matter" and "No Justice, No Peace," the chant of "Philando, Philando" rang out as they marched down the highway in the dark of night.

Smithsonian
Take a Stroll Through Jane Austen's England With This Interactive Map

smithsonian.com Beloved 19th-century author Jane Austen's satire of Georgian Britain's high teas and grand balls is so slyly entrancing, naïve readers might mistake that world for her own. Born in 1775 into the "pseudo-gentry," an educated but landless lower class, Austen, whose literary oeuvre includes Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, Lady Susan and Emma, only peeped high society through better-off relatives and friends.

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