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Felipe De La Hoz

Immigration and policy reporter with an investigative and explanatory bent

Location icon United States

Along with Gaby Del Valle, Felipe runs the weekly immigration policy-focused newsletter BORDER/LINES (borderlines.substack.com). He is a former reporter for the investigative immigration news site Documented, and previously covered local immigration, government, policy, elections, housing, arts, and other issues for the Village Voice, Gotham Gazette, City & State, The Wall Street Journal, and other outlets.

He is a graduate New York University, the Dow Jones News Fund's data journalism program, and The New York Times Student Journalism Institute. Generally a fan of data and skeptical of conventional wisdom. He sometimes shoots his own photographs and video.

Portfolio
Documented
New York, a Sanctuary State, Provides Criminal Justice Data to ICE

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) forwards information on certain immigrants to Immigration and Customs Enforcement so that they can be apprehended, Documented has found. It's a practice the agency has long denied; spokesman Justin Mason said last year that "[a]ny assertion that DCJS is somehow willfully feeding information to ICE in order to assist with deportations is simply false.

Documented
New York State Risks Losing Federal Funds Because of Poor Census Planning

Ensuring an accurate count in the decennial U.S. Census is critical for every locality in the U.S. It's a crucial part of the process to receive hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funds for education, infrastructure, health, and other public programs, as well as determining the level of representation in Congress and the makeup of state legislatures.

Documented
Jumaane Williams Elected Public Advocate in Crowded Race

Felipe De La Hoz The Brooklyn City Council Member has long been an advocate for immigrants rights. Politics Primary category in which blog post is published Brooklyn City Council Member Jumaane Williams, the son of Grenadian immigrants, has scored a decisive win in the special election for New York City Public Advocate.

Documented
State legislators in Albany May Consider Extending Health Insurance to the Undocumented

As legislators in Albany gear up for a contentious fight over the possibility of establishing the nation's first single-payer health insurance system-through the New York Health Act-immigration advocates are pushing for a simpler change to New York's insurance system: the expansion of eligibility for the existing, state-run Essential Plan health insurance program to include undocumented residents.

Documented
U.S. Rep Yvette Clarke Says House Homeland Committee Will Probe Immigration Enforcement

U.S. Rep. Yvette Clarke, the Brooklyn Democrat recently assigned to the House Committee on Homeland Security, said she has discussed oversight of federal immigration enforcement with Committee Chairman and Mississippi Democrat Bennie Thompson. She said she expects to send letters of inquiry about policies and procedures surrounding enforcement processes to supervisory personnel at agencies like U.S.

Documented
Documents Show New York Court Officers Alerted ICE About Immigrants in Court

In mid-March of 2017, a court officer at the Manhattan Criminal Court on Centre Street was approached by Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agent, Willie Outlaw. Outlaw, who was in plain clothes, asked the court officer to call him when a man named Stanley* appeared for his court date, then gave the officer his business card.

Documented
Thousands of immigration cases are on hold due to the government shutdown

Normally, the twelfth floor of the federal building at 26 Federal Plaza in downtown Manhattan is bustling with activity, as immigrants, their families, attorneys, and personnel from Homeland Security and the Justice Department come and go to immigration courtrooms that see dozens of hearings a day.

Documented
Trump Administration May Have Violated Law in Ending TPS for Haitians

The Department of Homeland Security may have violated its own policies and federal law in its effort to terminate Temporary Protected Status designation for Haitian nationals, according to a former Obama administration official. In court testimony Tuesday, Leon Rodriguez, who was director of the U.S.

Documented
Surprise Docket Leaves NYC ICE Detainees Unrepresented in Court

The skinny 18-year-old Honduran sat off to the right side of the immigration courtroom, shackled at the hands and waist and alone except for the interpreter translating the proceedings to him. The court documentation indicated that the teenager had agreed to be deported after illegally crossing the southern U.S.

Documented
New York City Considering Health Care Program That Would Cover Undocumented Immigrants

New York City policymakers are mulling a wide-ranging proposal to provide subsidized health care to people who cannot qualify for federal or state-managed health insurance - primarily undocumented immigrants. If it comes to fruition, it would be the country's largest municipal health care plan for the uninsurable, following those in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Documented
ICE Again Increases Arrests of New Yorkers With No Criminal Records

According to statistics released by Immigration and Customs Enforcement today, immigration-related administrative arrests by Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers at the agency's New York City office increased about 35 percent to 3,476 in the fiscal year 2018 that ended Sept. 30 from 2,576 in fiscal year 2017.

Documented
The Last Harvest

It is Sunday, so the men have extra time to prepare a hearty stew in the kitchenette opposite to a small shrine to the Mexican Virgin of Guadalupe. Outside, enormous warehouses line this sparse lot in Orange County, New York. Each holds thousands and thousands of onions, filling multiple cavernous spaces.

Documented
On Long Island, Latino Voters Could Be the Democrats' Dark Horse

It is becoming an axiom of political punditry that the Democratic Party takes its African-American voters for granted. Among progressive groups in New York, that maxim extends to the ballooning Latino population on Long Island, a potential political bludgeon that they believe has been ignored by the political establishment, but which could swing races if properly motivated.

Documented
Video Shows Court Staff Helping ICE Agents Make Arrest

A cell phone video shared with Documented appears to show uniformed New York State Court Officers helping plainclothes Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents subdue a man and escort him out to a waiting car outside of the Queens County Criminal Court. The video was shared anonymously with the Immigrant Defense Project and provided to Documented.

Documented
Bolsonaro Won More Than 70 Percent of Brazilian Voters in NYC. Why?

On Sunday, Brazilians elected Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing nationalist and member of Brazilian Congress to be the country's next president, part of a continuing wave of anti-establishmentarian populism that has bubbled up throughout the globe. Bolsonaro defeated Workers' Party (PT) candidate Fernando Haddad in the runoff race by a ten-point margin, with 55.1 percent of the vote to Haddad's 44.9 percent.

Documented
City Agencies Mobilize as They Brace for Public Charge Rule

Unlike some of the more straightforward threats to New York City's immigrant populations, the so-called "public charge" rule is so nebulous and loaded with procedure that it's creating fear and confusion among those who may not even be affected.

Documented
Hudson County Votes to Limit ICE Contract

After a tense, four-and-a-half hour meeting on Thursday evening, the Hudson County Freeholders approved a resolution to end the county's contract to hold ICE detainees at the Hudson County Correctional Facility by December 2020.

Documented
Enrollment in Benefits Drop in Response to Trump Rules, Data Shows

The Trump administration said Saturday it may deny green cards to immigrants who legally use public benefits like housing vouchers and food assistance because it thinks such people are taking undue advantage of government benefits. As it happens, just making that threat appears to cause immigrants to drop public benefits they are legally entitled to.

Documented
The New York Primaries are Over. What Does it Mean for Immigration Policy?

For New York State's immigrants - over one-fifth of the population - Gov. Andrew Cuomo's easy victory over progressive challenger Cynthia Nixon leaves two possible paths forward, one more likely than the other. The first is that the spirited primary race and the appetite for unabashed leftism in the activist base of the Democratic party have driven Cuomo leftward on immigration issues.

Documented
Exclusive: City Council Calls For Ban on All Contracts with ICE

Christopher Lee for Documented New legislation would prevent the city from contracting with "entities engaged in immigration enforcement." Politics Primary category in which blog post is published The New York City Council may soon explicitly prohibit the city from engaging in any contractual relationships with "entities engaged in immigration enforcement," according to the language of a new bill set to be introduced on Wednesday by Carlos Menchaca, chair of the Committee on Immigration.

Documented
Councilman Demands Answers From ICE Over Continued Video Hearings

A member of the New York City Council demanded answers from Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Tuesday, over the agency's refusal to bring detained immigrants to court hearings. The Varick Street immigration court has had to resort to video hearings more often due to a recent shift by ICE to not allow immigrants to physically appear in court.

Documented
Zephyr Teachout Wants to Prosecute ICE

New York attorney general candidate Zephyr Teachout recently set off a firestorm in right-wing circles by asserting that she would initiate prosecutions of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) personnel if elected.

Documented
City Council Passes Cap on For-Hire Vehicles

The New York City Council has approved measures to limit the spread of app-based for-hire vehicles and blunt some of the repercussions of a ballooning number of vehicles operated by companies like Uber and Lyft.

Documented
New Jersey Jail is Holding Nearly Triple its Capacity in ICE Detainees

One New Jersey jail where Immigration and Customs Enforcement holds immigrants hit nearly triple its capacity for federal detainees recently, according to government data. Bergen County Jail held an average daily population (ADP) of 336 detainees in the first month of fiscal year 2018, from October to November 2017.

Documented
Judge Rules ICE Improperly Held Pablo Villavicencio in 'Custody'

A judge ruled on Wednesday night that Immigration and Customs Enforcement had been improperly keeping Pablo Villavicencio, a pizza deliveryman who was detained at a Brooklyn army base last month, in a form of custody even after he was ordered released.

Documented
This Family Followed the Government's Rules. They Were Separated Anyway

The story that Carlos has to tell about being separated from his 12-year-old daughter at the Texas border is a common one for migrants fleeing Central America recently - and yet his experience differs in significant ways from those arrested under the Trump administration's now-defunct "zero tolerance" policy.

Documented
For One Man, Immigration Detention Nearly Meant Death

For Miguel Almonte, the problems started almost as soon as he walked through the door. He already had significant medical issues by the time he was detained at Hudson County Correctional Facility in Kearny, N.J. in March of 2015.

Documented
Attorneys Aid Hundreds of Detainees in an Albany Jail

COLONIE - On a Thursday morning at the Albany County Correctional Facility, men and women in bright orange jumpsuits came and went as guards spoke curtly into radios. The scene was unremarkable for a county jail, except for one major difference: most of the detainees brought out from the facility's secure area were migrants.

Documented
Lawsuits Allege Misconduct at Agencies Taking in Unaccompanied Minors

Children have been sexually assaulted, beaten and even turned to prostitution while under the custody of three New York child care agencies that are also taking in children separated from their parents by the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy, according to lawsuits reviewed by Documented.

Documented
NY Congressional Candidates Explain How to Abolish ICE

The past year has seen an explosion in public awareness and subsequent fury for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. This anger has spread to the realm of progressive political organizing and became a central plank for two upstart Democratic primary campaigns for Congress: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Suraj Patel. Ocasio-Cortez is challenging incumbent Rep.

Documented
Albany Democrats Claim Few Victories on Immigration. Can They Start Winning Now?

Early in his term as governor, Eliot Spitzer introduced a plan to issue driver's licenses to all New Yorkers, regardless of their immigration status. Now a fairly commonplace practice, the proposal drew swift and decisive pushback from state Republicans and Spitzer's own Democratic party, including current rising star Kirsten Gillibrand.

Documented
Scott Stringer on Immigration

The New York City comptroller is the city's chief fiscal officer, the person tasked with keeping the city's balance sheets and pension funds in good financial shape. In a city with a foreign-born population of around 40 percent, and in which immigrants make up an enormous amount of the small business owners and wage-earners, the question of immigration is inextricably tied to the financial well-being and viability.

City & State New York
UPK was a big success. 3K for All won't be so easy.

Four years after New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the city would provide prekindergarten for every 4-year-old in the city and then overcame skepticism to deliver his most popular policy to date, the mayor announced his intention last year to provide similar services for 3-year-olds citywide.

The Village Voice
In A New Show, Immigrant Artists Reckon with the Plight of Displacement

It's a bit of a sad axiom that tragedy often precedes creativity and artistic creation. War, famine, disease, they've all served as the backdrop for centuries' worth of innovation and reinvention in art, serving to simultaneously channel the desperation of the artist's circumstances and help shape and recontextualize those circumstances going forward.

The Village Voice
America Under Threat

The overheated media circus that is the annual State of Union address isn't one of those solemn traditions perverted by our current reality-show existence; rather, the whole affair has, for over a century now, been a largely cosmetic exercise in partisan bravado from both the president and the opposing party.

The Village Voice
Chuck Schumer Gives Away the Farm in Shutdown Deal

All politics is about backroom negotiations and horse-trading: There's always a carrot or a stick to force through legislation and keep the country chugging along. On Monday, immigration activists watched in dismay as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer appeared to surrender his caucus' biggest stick in the fight over the fate of roughly 700,000 members of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, in exchange for practically nothing.

The Village Voice
Speaker Front-Runner Corey Johnson Seeks "Seismic Impact"

When the New York City Council votes on its new Speaker tomorrow, to replace term-limited Melissa Mark-Viverito, it's now expected that Councilmember Corey Johnson will be the winner. Johnson, who represents a swath of western Manhattan from Hell's Kitchen, appears to have won the support of the powerful Queens and Bronx County Democratic organizations, as well as onetime Speaker race opponents Mark Levine, Ydanis Rodriguez, Donovan Richards, and Jimmy Van Bramer.

The Village Voice
Legal Aid Lawyers Stage Walkout After Yet Another ICE Court Arrest

Chaos erupted at Brooklyn Criminal Court Tuesday morning after agents with Immigration and Customs Enforcement snatched a defendant in the hallway, prompting a walkout by public defenders and accusations from court officers that Legal Aid attorneys had physically attacked them. Genaro Rojas Hernandez, 30, was in court to face charges of violating a restraining order.

The Village Voice
Did Brooklyn Councilmember Mathieu Eugene Break Electioneering Laws?

For most New York City Council incumbents, election day was largely predictable and uneventful, with all but one councilmember running for re-election settling in for another four years. (Queens councilwoman Liz Crowley was narrowly defeated by challenger Bob Holden.)

The Village Voice
Court Officers Are Aiding in Immigration Arrests, Say Lawyers

Ishmael Garcia-Velasquez wore a suit and tie to Brooklyn Criminal Court on Tuesday morning. The 35-year-old father has made routine appearances over the past seven months on petit larceny and misdemeanor assault charges, according to his lawyer. But this time, after yet another adjournment, plainclothes agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement handcuffed Garcia-Velasquez outside of the courtroom.

The Village Voice
A Former NYC City Council Intern Sets His Sights on Speaker's Chair

Since the November 7 general election, all eyes are shifting in one direction: the New York City Council, whose members new and old must pick their next Speaker as term-limited Melissa Mark-Viverito departs. There's a whole lot of intrigue in the wrangling for the seat, as party bosses play coy and candidates dangle committee chairmanships for their colleagues.

The Village Voice
Why Don't We Let Noncitizen Residents Vote?

New York has long suffered from abysmal voter turnout, and this election cycle so far hasn't provided much cause for optimism. Hopes of a post-Trump voter engagement bump in the September primaries were dashed as of registered Democrats turned out for the only contested mayoral primary, the lowest percentage since 2009.

The Village Voice
Immigrants Tell Trump: We Won't Trade Our Freedoms

After weeks of fraught negotiations, the fate of a potential legislative replacement for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program still hasn't been resolved, leaving the hundreds of thousands of undocumented Americans previously shielded by the program in a state of legal limbo as its March 5 termination date approaches.

The Village Voice
Trump Is 'Mandate' for City to Act, Says Speaker Hopeful

After the coarse spectacle that was last week's mayoral debates, the race for Gracie Mansion is dominating much of the political oxygen in the room, at least for now. Following the November 7 general election, however, all eyes will immediately shift in one direction: the New York City Council, whose members new and old must pick their next Speaker as term-limited Melissa Mark-Viverito departs.

The Village Voice
The Mayoral Debate Was Mostly About Yelling a Lot

The mayoral general election debate that took place Tuesday night was never going to be very much about substance, and most everyone knew it. This was true of the crowds milling around the venue, Symphony Space, before the 7 p.m. start time, where the chanting and yelling mostly steered clear of any substantive policy points.

The Village Voice
Hospital Cuts Set for Sunday Will Hit New York's Latinos Hardest

As concerns mount over a possible whirlwind of federal budget cuts to an array of state programs and agencies - from housing to education to infrastructure - one obscure program in particular poses a major threat to healthcare for New York City's poorer, uninsured residents, and especially its Latino population.

The Village Voice
Young Immigrants Wait and Organize as Trump DACA Drama Drags On

Two weeks after President Donald Trump announced he was rescinding the protections offered to young undocumented immigrants by his predecessor Barack Obama, the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program remains murky.

The Village Voice
Spared Full Force of Irma, Bahamians Organize Relief, Worry for Future

At the 11 a.m. church service at Harlem's Bethany Baptist Church on September 10, the wooden pews were largely filled with well-dressed older New Yorkers. Most were first- or second-generation immigrants from the English-speaking islands and archipelagos of the Caribbean, which at that moment had already been battered by Hurricane Irma and were bracing for the possibility of more storms as well.

The Village Voice
Unhappy With Your Ballot Options? Blame the Board of Elections

As New York City voters headed to the polls this week, they may have left wondering why they ultimately have so few choices. The reasons are manifold; as my Voice colleague Ross Barkan has pointed out in his reporting, many are de facto realities of a political system where institutional inertia is king.

Gotham Gazette
Public Advocate Candidate Outlines Election Reform Agenda

JC Polanco on BronxNet With candidates vying for votes ahead of New York City's September primary and November general elections, many in and around campaigns know that the state's antiquated election laws will, in part, ensure that a small percentage of potential voters will cast ballots among limited choices.

Gotham Gazette
Under Trump, A Potential Silver Lining for NYCHA

NYCHA and the city (photo: @ZodetN) Since the January inauguration of Donald Trump as president, department heads and administrators throughout New York City government have been bracing for negative reverberations, with many expecting slashed federal spending and harmful policy rollbacks. At least one city agency sees a potential silver lining.

Gotham Gazette
Inside the Numbers: Mayoral Campaign Spending

Mayor de Blasio at his reelection headquarters (@BilldeBlasio) As New York City's campaign season hurtles toward the September 12 primaries and November 7 general election, bringing new flurries of fundraising and spending from mayoral candidates, attention has largely been focused on the 'raising,' with a few recent donations getting headlines.

Gotham Gazette
Malliotakis Received Max Contribution from Dan Loeb

Nicole Malliotakis (photo: @NMalliotakis) Daniel Loeb, the investor, political donor, and charter school network leader who has found himself embroiled in controversy after racially charged remarks about State Senate Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins, donated the maximum allowable contribution of $4,950 to the campaign of presumptive Republican mayoral nominee Nicole Malliotakis.

Gotham Gazette
At Oversight Hearing, Council Members Seek Answers on MTA Funding and Operations

Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez (photo William Alatriste/New York City Council) At a contentious hours-long hearing held on Tuesday by the the City Council's Committee on Transportation, Council members grilled representatives of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) on the problems facing the city's transit infrastructure and the challenges of finding both short- and long-term funding streams to adequately maintain and upgrade the city's subway system.

Gotham Gazette
Removal of Last Primary Opponent Could Cost Malliotakis

GOP mayoral candidate Nicole Malliotakis (photo: @NMalliotakis) After Michel Faulkner shifted his mayoral campaign to one for comptroller and real estate executive Paul Massey suspended his altogether, State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis' campaign began referring to her as "the presumptive Republican nomee in the race for Mayor."

Gotham Gazette
Stringer Updates Transparency Website to Show More Subcontracting

Comptroller (photo via @NYCComptroller) New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer is modifying the website showing city spending to include more information on sub-vendors, providing an added layer of transparency to the tool that helps shed light on hundreds of billions of dollars in city contracting.

Gotham Gazette
LaGuardia College President Whipped Colleague Support for Cuomo Scholarship

Cuomo with Hillary Clinton, Gail Mellow, far right, & others (photo: Governor's Office) Dr. Gail O. Mellow, the president of LaGuardia Community College, contacted fellow City University of New York (CUNY) presidents to gather statements in support of the proposed Excelsior Scholarship program on behalf of Governor Andrew Cuomo, before the proposal was passed and signed into law earlier this year.

Gotham Gazette
Bo Dietl: Running City Government 'Isn't Rocket Science'

Bo Dietl at his office (photo: Ben Max) In his 50th floor corner office in Midtown, the characteristically brash private security CEO Bo Dietl made the case Monday morning for his outsider mayoral candidacy. Appearing on the Max & Murphy podcast, Dietl explained his brand, his political evolution from Republican to Democrat, and his independent candidacy for the city's top job.

Gotham Gazette
Council Speaker Contenders Spread the Wealth to Colleagues

Speaker Mark-Viverito (center) and Council Member Johnson (r) (photo: William Alatriste/New York City Council) A number of City Council Members who are jockeying to replace Melissa Mark-Viverito as the next Speaker of the City Council seem to be stepping up efforts to curry favor with their colleagues and other elected officials through strategic campaign donations.

Gotham Gazette
Malliotakis Files Records Request for Mayor's Travel Expenses

Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis (photo: Felipe De La Hoz/Gotham Gazette) As Mayor Bill de Blasio spent his third day in Queens for his week-long City Hall in Your Borough initiative, presumptive Republican mayoral nominee Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis showed up at his Manhattan workplace to reprimand the mayor for a lack of transparency for his numerous trips out of the city.

Gotham Gazette
Longshot Mayoral Hopeful Outraises & Outspends Opponents, Technically

Michael Tolkin (center) at a Reform Party forum (photo: Tolkinformayor.com) Michael Tolkin, a 32-year-old tech entrepreneur who is among over a dozen long-shot candidates running to unseat New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, appears to have outspent every other contender in the race, including the mayor, with a $5 million in-kind contribution to his own campaign.

Gotham Gazette
New York's Top Democrats Rally Against Obamacare Repeal Bill

Governor Cuomo at Monday's healthcare rally (photo: Governor's Office) At a packed auditorium at Mount Sinai Hospital Monday afternoon, four of the state's top elected Democrats united in a show of force to rally against a common enemy: the Republican-led U.S. Senate's bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare.

Gotham Gazette
De Blasio's Progressivism Doesn't Include Right to Public Transit

Mayor de Blasio & First Lady McCray (photo: Edwin J Torres/Mayor's Office) In his three-and-a-half years as mayor of the nation's largest city, Bill de Blasio has focused his administration on bridging gaps between the haves and the have-nots, expanding opportunity for those left behind during the city's recent boom years.

Gotham Gazette
'Zombie' Charter School Agreement Rests on Interpretation of Ambiguous Law

(photo: Demetrius Freeman/Mayor's Office) A much talked-about provision of Mayor Bill de Blasio's 13th-hour deal to have his control over city schools extended was the agreement that 22 revoked or surrendered charter school charters could be reissued without counting towards the predetermined state cap on the number of charter schools.

Gotham Gazette
Cuomo Refuses to Comply with Trump Election Commission Request

New Yorkers cast their votes for President (photo: Edwin J. Torres/Mayoral Photo Office) New York has joined the ranks of states refusing to comply with a request for voter information sent yesterday by Kris Kobach, the Kansas Secretary of State and vice chair of the newly-created federal Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.

Gotham Gazette
Calls for Vetoes as 'Benefit Sweeteners' Head to Governor's Desk

(photo: The Governor's Office) As the dust settles on the scheduled legislative session in Albany and subsequent "extraordinary session" called by Governor Andrew Cuomo, much of the focus has been on the extension of mayoral control of city schools, finally passed Thursday after serious brinkmanship.

Gotham Gazette
High Participation in Campaign Matching Funds, But Several Big Name Opt-Outs

Council Member Kallos (photo: City Council) As the September 12 primary elections approach and campaigns kick into high gear, a vast majority of candidates for the city's elected offices will have their coffers bolstered by the Campaign Finance Board's (CFB) public matching funds program, which matches eligible donations at a 6-to-1 ratio.

Gotham Gazette
'Interventionist' De Blasio Unveils Ten-Year Jobs Plan

The Mayor & his jobs plan (photo: Felipe De La Hoz) Holding up a glossy, 114-page booklet emblazoned with "New York Works" in bold yellow lettering - the same words hanging from the wall behind him - Mayor Bill de Blasio promised on Thursday to make New York City the "capital of cyber security."

Gotham Gazette
With Subways in Crisis, It's Showtime for Mayoral Candidates

(photo: The Governor's Office) Standing near a City Hall subway stop, Staten Island Assembly member and GOP mayoral candidate Nicole Malliotakis railed against Mayor Bill de Blasio's handling of the city's transit system and its state-controlled operator, the Metropolitan Transit Authority.

Gotham Gazette
On the Bus to Albany for Better New York Voting Laws

One Vote Better NY lobbyist (photo: @NYCVotes) Two charter buses idling in downtown Manhattan in the early hours of the morning on a weekday would usually be full of mismatched tourists from far-flung states and countries, waiting to gape at the Wall Street bull and his recently-placed female antagonist.

Gotham Gazette
Stakeholders Discuss Next Steps in Eliminating Homelessness Among Military Veterans

The panel (photo: Felipe De La Hoz/Gotham Gazette) A forum held Thursday night at the New York City Bar Association featured advocates and officials at the city and federal levels to discuss the insidious problem of homelessness among military veterans. The city's newly created Department of Veterans Services estimates that New York City is home to over 210,000 veterans.

Gotham Gazette
District Attorneys Outline Budget Needs at the City Council

Council Members Vanessa Gibson and Robert Cornegy (photo: William Alatriste) At a preliminary budget hearing before the City Council committee on Public Safety Thursday morning, the district attorneys of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island and representatives for the district attorneys of Brooklyn and Queens and the Office of the Special Narcotics Prosecutor laid out the case for their budget priorities.

Gotham Gazette
Killing of FDNY EMT Spotlights Issues for Unsung Profession

(photos: @FDNY) Of the city's various uniformed workers, some dominate media attention and public awareness. Along with the historical presence and mythology of firefighters and police officers, corrections officers have been in the news recently, mostly for the wrong reasons, while New Yorkers rely on sanitation workers for a basic essential of city life.

Gotham Gazette
The March Money Race in 'Open' City Council Seats

Marjorie Velazquez (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette) In a February special election, Harlemites voted then-state Senator Bill Perkins to fill a City Council seat vacated by Inez Dickens, who had been previously elected to the state Assembly. Heading toward the regularly-scheduled September primary elections and November general, there are now seven "open" City Council seats in the 51-seat body.

Gotham Gazette
De Blasio Faces Local Questions About 'Mansion Tax' Plan

Mayor de Blasio (photo: Edwin J. Torres/ Mayor's Office) A report released by the city Independent Budget Office has raised questions about the potential effects of the so-called "mansion tax," a proposed part of Mayor Bill de Blasio's affordable housing strategy that would levy a 2.5 percent surcharge on the sale price over a threshold of $2 million for residential properties.

The Wall Street Journal
New Michael Crichton Novel Discovered by Widow

A newly discovered novel from late writer Michael Crichton is on the way. "Dragon Teeth" is set in the late 19th century American West. It focuses on the real-life rivalry between paleontologists Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh - during a time known as the "Bone Wars" - as seen through the story of fictional character William [...]

The Wall Street Journal
The 'Harry Potter and the Cursed Child' Hype Machine Takes Manhattan

As noon approached on Thursday, policemen and men in dark suits with earpieces stood in front of the Scholastic headquarters on Broadway in New York City. They weren't there to protect a dignitary, politician or celebrity, though one celebrity's name certainly was on everyone's lips: wizard and literary character Harry Potter.

The Wall Street Journal
Mike Birbiglia on His New Movie, 'Don't Think Twice'

Mike Birbiglia, whose second directorial effort, "Don't Think Twice," will be released on Friday, has been writing stand-up comedy since he was 16. After the success of his debut film, "Sleepwalk with Me," a semi-autobiographical depiction of a comic's struggles with a sleepwalking disorder - which Birbiglia himself actually suffered from - he continued doing stand-up.

The Wall Street Journal
Gender Equality Comes to the World of Emoji

In the arsenal of tools to promote gender equality, one not often mentioned are emoji, the colorful little descendants to the emoticon, inserted into text to convey thoughts or emotions efficiently in the brave new world of instant messaging. Yesterday, the Unicode Consortium approved emoji for 11 new professions, such as welder and scientist, that [...]

The Wall Street Journal
For Author Jesse Ball, a Book Release is Like a Game of Backgammon

Prolific writer and eccentric educator Jesse Ball is not known for straightforward storytelling. His latest novel, "How to Set a Fire and Why," is structured as a series of predictions, journal entries and pamphlets compiled by the book's precocious teenage narrator, Lucia. So it's not necessarily a surprise that at a reading this past Wednesday night, [...]

Observer
Adobe's Khoi Vinh Knows What Design Needs: More Discussion

Despite the abundance of design commentary circulating the web, Adobe mobile product design chief Khoi Vinh doesn't believe that the design community has reached the "level of maturity" in its public discussion that fields like architecture and film enjoy.

Observer
A Conversation With The Hunting Ground's Kirby Dick

The Hunting Ground was released in February of this year it sent tremors through much of the country. Described by the New York Times as a "documentary shocker," the movie examines sexual assault and the often insufficient institutional response to it on college campuses across the United States.

Observer
Arrested for Subway Busking? You Could be in for a Settlement

As confused commuters hurried past, some stopping to snap a few cell phone pictures before rushing to catch the incoming G train, Matthew Christian stood among subway musicians wearing a shirt that read "Music is legal." Mr. Christian is one of the co-founders of Busk New York, an organization that advocates for subway buskers, or street performers.

Observer
Chelsea Clinton Gets Personal At Downtown LGBT Center

Asked about her experiences learning about LGBT issues at a forum in downtown Manhattan, Chelsea Clinton struck a deeply personal note. "I think the first time I heard the word 'gay' was when one of my mom's law partners killed himself because he couldn't figure out how to come out to his family," Ms. Clinton said, adding that she was 7 years old at the time.

Observer
NYU Student Workers Will Be Paid $15 an Hour

That is New York University's total estimated cost for "direct expenses," which are tuition, mandatory fees and room and board. Factor in New York City's cost of living, 68.8% higher than the national average as calculated by personal finance company Smartasset, and it's easy to see why many students are struggling with financials, or have even dropped out .

Observer
In New York, LGBT Veterans and Advocates Call for 'Restoration of Honor'

In the face of what they call Congressional inaction, a coalition of New York City activists, aid groups and elected officials are pushing for reform on the rights of gay veterans. For many of the nation's discharged LGBT service members, activating benefits normally earned through service isn't an option.

Observer
City Council Members to Introduce Bills on HDFC Co-op Transparency

The running on how to make sure that Housing Development Fund Corporation co-ops remain successful low-income home-ownership vehicles may soon get a boost from something it's been conspicuously missing: cold, hard data. "It's a murky world right now," Manhattan Councilman Mark Levine told the Observer.

Observer
Little Consensus on the Future of Rikers Island at Sharpton Town Hall

On Monday night, Rev. Al Sharpton held a town hall with Correction Officers' Benevolent Association president Norman Seabrook and Bronx District Attorney Darcel Clark to discuss the future of the Rikers Island jail-and to express concern about recent proposals to close the jail complex.

Observer
Assembly Housing Committee Holds Hearing on Co-ops

On Friday, members of the State Assembly's Housing Committee gathered at a conference room in Harlem to hear expansive, sometimes contradictory testimony on co-operative housing in New York.

Observer
Uber Cutting Rates Amid Fierce Competition

Uber, the popular ride-hailing app, implemented a rate cut today for its Uber X and Uber XL services. Minimum fares will drop from $8 to $7, per-mile rates will go from $2.15 to $1.75 and per-minute rates will drop to 35 cents from 40. The changes were first reported by the New York Post.

Observer
Starbucks Partners With Spotify on Mobile Music

Starbucks Coffee has announced a partnership with Spotify that would give 10 million My Starbucks Rewards members at any of 7,500 Starbucks company-operated stores in the U.S. the ability to identify music playing in the store, save and listen to Starbucks-curated songs through the Starbucks Mobile App.

amNewYork
Youngest NYC Councilman makes his mark in the Bronx

Within 15 minutes of arriving at P.S. 96 in the Bronx on a recent November morning, City Councilman Ritchie Torres asked his deputy chief of staff Juan Antigua to contact every public school in his district and find out if they had a music teacher.

amNewYork
Beloved LES pizzeria Vic's to close for good

Vic's Pizza on the Lower East Side has been selling New York's staple food for 45 years. On Saturday, the restaurant will bake its last pie before closing its doors for good. Victor Mendez, 48, Vic's owner, said the pizzareia's fate was inevitable after his neighbors closed shop recently.

amNewYork
Report: 2% of NYC buildings use 45% of energy

Two percent of the city's buildings use 45% of the city's energy, according to a new report by Climate Works For All. The organization, part of The Alliance for a Greater New York (ALIGN) and focused on combating climate change while creating jobs, used data that is publicly available through the city's energy consumption reporting requirements, enacted as part of the Greener, Greater Buildings (GGBP) laws.

amNewYork
NYC artist turns trash into treasure

Vinicius Ribeiro spends a lot of his time rifling through trash bins, peering under garbage bags and lugging home other people's refuse. He's not looking for food or plastic bottles to sell; he's hunting raw materials to use for his art. "At the beginning, people used to look at me and say: 'He's a garbage collector.'

amNewYork
Market Diner to close for new West Side development

Posted on the doors of Market Diner is a letter from a family of longtime regulars. It includes warm memories and features a picture of two children, standing in front of distinctive Art Deco building and beaming at the camera. But the tone of the letter is bittersweet.

amNewYork
Rally in Brooklyn against police brutality

Around 150 activists gathered in Brooklyn's Cadman Plaza on Thursday to call for police reform as part of the annual National Day of Protest. Activists for Palestinian justice, transgender rights and police reform shared stories, sang, read poems and yelled at the assembled police presence.

amNewYork
Dozens turn out in support of Obama immigration programs

Dozens of supporters flooded Battery Park Tuesday in support of an Obama-sponsored program that would protect undocumented immigrants from deportation and temporarily grant them the ability to work. Against a backdrop of signs reading "Justice Delayed is Justice Denied," about 50 people urged the federal 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans to reverse the lower court's decision, filed against Texas and 25 other states, and do so quickly.

amNewYork
Food vendors rally at City Hall over cap on permits

More than 100 people gathered outside City Hall Tuesday, frustrated by the city's cap on special food and vending permits. While the city has issued more than 17,600 food vendor licenses, only vendors with one of 4,100 special permits can have a food cart on the street.

amNewYork
Secrets of NYU

At 174 years and counting, New York University has its fair share of fascinating details and hidden gems. (Credit: Yeong-Ung Yang) landmarks Shhhh... Your secret is safe with us. Submit a secret and it may get published in amNewYork and on amny.com!

The Village Voice
This Brooklyn Activist Is Making Life Hell for Her Community Board

The meeting ended just as most have over the past year: Alicia Boyd was shouting at Community Board 9 District Manager Pearl Miles. And Miles was shouting back. "You're corrupt, Pearl!" yelled Boyd, to which Miles replied: "I don't care!" Asked to clarify, Miles quickly mumbled that she meant she didn't care what Boyd thought.

Time
Robert Capa Reveals an Ugly Side of Liberation in WWII France

The 1944 liberation of occupied France during World War II endures in our collective memory as a clash of mighty armies -- a visual rhetoric that distills the horrors of the occupation, the struggle for freedom and the jubilation of the liberation itself.

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